We analyze. You decide!

An Analysis of the Literary Dependency of
The Desire of Ages, Chapter 76

Some critics have accused Ellen White of plagiarizing the contents of The Desire of Ages from the writings of various authors. But, did she really? Below is an analysis of the alleged comparisons.

It has been noted by students of plagiarism that one can make a work look plagiarized when it is not by carefully using ellipses and discarding all the material that is different. What we want to do is determine whether the critics did a fair analysis, or whether their comparisons actually distorted reality. Accordingly, we have coded the text so that you, the reader, can easily come to your own conclusion. Material that is not coded means that neither the critics, nor Dr. Veltman and his team, could not, or did not, find anything worthy of note.

Color Key

Material in Ellen G. White that is an exact, word-for-word match to her alleged source.

Material in Ellen G. White that is similar to her alleged source.

Words that are either an exact, or similar, match of the source, but are also an exact, or similar, match to Biblical material.

Material that is represented in either Rea's book or Dr. Veltman's study by an ellipsis.

Material dropped from the beginning or end of the paragraph of the alleged source in Rea's book.

Material clipped from the beginning or end of a sentence in Rea's book, without giving the reader any indication of such. (Either a capital letter or a period appears where it should not, hiding the fact that material is missing.)

Material that was mis-capitalized or mis-abbreviated in Rea.

Typical author's caveat: all errors are, of course, mine. If you find any errors please let me know and I'll fix them.

Alleged Sources Desire of Ages. (1898)
Hanna, Life of Christ. page 649

They offered him thirty pieces of silver, a very paltry bribe--the price in the old Hebrew code of a slave that was gored by an ox--less than 5 of our money; a bribe insufficient of itself to have tempted even a grossly avaricious man, in the position in which Judas was, to betray his Master, knowing or believing that it was unto death.

Hanna, skipping back one page, page 648

We should be nearer the truth, I suspect if we took him as an average specimen of what the passion of avarice, or any like passion, when once it has got the mastery, may lead any man to be and do.

Judas

      The history of Judas presents the sad ending of a life that might have been honored of God. Had Judas died before his last journey to Jerusalem he would have been regarded as a man worthy of a place among the twelve, and one who would be greatly missed. The abhorrence which has followed him through the centuries would not have existed but for the attributes revealed at the close of his history. But it was for a purpose that his character was laid open to the world. It was to be a warning to all who, like him, should betray sacred trusts.

      A little before the Passover, Judas had renewed his contract with the priests to deliver Jesus into their hands. Then it was arranged that the Saviour should be taken at one of His resorts for meditation and prayer. Since the feast at the house of Simon, Judas had had opportunity to reflect upon the deed which he had covenanted to perform, but his purpose was unchanged. For thirty pieces of silver --the price of a slave--he sold the Lord of glory to ignominy and death.1

      Judas had naturally a strong love for money; but he had not always been corrupt enough to do such a deed as this. He had fostered the evil spirit of avarice until it had become the ruling motive of his life.2 The love of mammon overbalanced his love for Christ. Through becoming the slave of one vice he gave himself to Satan, to be driven to any lengths in sin.

      Judas had joined the disciples when multitudes were following Christ.3 The Saviour's teaching moved their hearts as they hung entranced upon His words, spoken in the synagogue, by the seaside, upon the mount.4

NOTES

      1 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      2 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      3 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      4 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

skipping to Alfred Edersheim The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah. (1886), page 473

He had, from such conviction as we have described, joined the movement at its very commencement. Then, multitudes in Galilee followed His Footsteps, and watched for His every appearance; they hung entranced on His lips in the Synagogue or on 'the Mount'; they flocked to Him from every town, village, and hamlet; they bore the sick and dying to His Feet, and witnessed, awestruck, how conquered devils gave their testimony to His Divine Power.

skipping over 3 sentences

And, oh! what power was there in His Face and Word, in His look and deed. And Judas, also, had been one of them who, on their early Mission, had temporarily had power given him, so that the very devils had been subject to them.

Dods, page 96

That Judas was trusted by the other Apostles is manifest from the fact that to him they committed their common fund,--not to John, whose dreamy and abstracted nature ill fitted him for minute practical affairs; not to Peter, whose impulsive nature might often have landed the little company in difficulties; not even to Matthew, accustomed as he was to accounts; but to Judas, who had the economical habits, the aptitude for finance, the love of bargaining, which regularly go hand in hand with the love of money.

Hanna, page 648

The little company, that he had joined had chosen him to be their treasurer, to hold and dispense the slender funds which they possessed.

Page 717

      Judas saw the sick, the lame, the blind, flock to Jesus from the towns and cities.5 He saw the dying laid at His feet.6 He witnessed the Saviour's mighty works in healing the sick, casting out devils, and raising the dead.7 He felt in his own person the evidence of Christ's power.8 He recognized the teaching of Christ as superior to all that he had ever heard. He loved the Great Teacher, and desired to be with Him. He felt a desire to be changed in character and life, and he hoped to experience this through connecting himself with Jesus. The Saviour did not repulse Judas. He gave him a place among the twelve. He trusted him to do the work of an evangelist. He endowed him with power to heal the sick and to cast out devils.9 But Judas did not come to the point of surrendering himself fully to Christ. He did not give up his worldly ambition or his love of money. While he accepted the position of a minister of Christ, he did not bring himself under the divine molding. He felt that he could retain his own judgment and opinions, and he cultivated a disposition to criticize and accuse.

      Judas was highly regarded by the disciples, and had great influence over them. He himself had a high opinion of his own qualifications, and looked upon his brethren as greatly inferior to him in judgment and ability. They did not see their opportunities, he thought, and take advantage of circumstances. The church would never prosper with such shortsighted men as leaders. Peter was impetuous; he would move without consideration. John, who was treasuring up the truths that fell from Christ's lips, was looked upon by Judas as a poor financier. Matthew, whose training had taught him accuracy in all things, was very particular in regard to honesty, and he was ever contemplating the words of Christ, and became so absorbed in them that, as Judas thought, he could not be trusted to do sharp, far-seeing business. Thus Judas summed up all the disciples, and flattered himself that the church would often be brought into perplexity and embarrassment if it were not for his ability as a manager. Judas regarded himself as the capable one, who could not be overreached. In his own estimation he was an honor to the cause, and as such he always represented himself.

      Judas was blinded to his own weakness of character, and Christ placed him where he would have an opportunity to see and correct this. As treasurer for the disciples, he was called upon to provide for the needs of the little company, and to relieve the necessities of the poor.10 When in the Passover chamber Jesus said to him, "That thou doest, do quickly" (John 13:27), the disciples thought He had bidden him

NOTES

      5 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      6 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      7 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      8 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      9 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      10 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

skipping over to Dods, The Gospel of John, Vol. 2, page 101

Naturally, covetous, he fed his evil disposition during those years he carried the bag for the disciples, while the rest are taken up with more spiritual matters, he gives more of his thought than is needful to the matter of collecting as much as possible; he counts it his special province to protect himself and the others against all "the probable emergencies and charges of life."

skipping back Edersheim, this time to page 77

Gradually, increasingly, came the disenchantment. It was quite another Kingdom, that of Christ; quite another Kingship than what had set Judas aglow.

Edershiem, page 77

His confidence must have been terribly shaken when the Baptist was beheaded.

Edershiem, page 473

But, step by step, had come the disappointment. John was beheaded, and not avenged; on the contrary, Jesus withdrew Himself. This constant withdrawing, whether from enemies or from success--almost amounting to flight--even when they would have made Him a King; this refusal to show Himself openly, either at Jerusalem, as His own brethren had taunted Him, or, indeed, anywhere else; this uniform preaching of discouragement to them, when they came to Him elated and hopeful at some success; this gathering enmity of Israel's leaders, and his marked avoidance of, or, as some might have put it, His failure in taking up the repeated public challenge of the Pharisees to show a sign from heaven; last, and chief of all, this constant and growing

page 474

reference to shame, disaster, and death--what did it all mean, if not disappointment of all those hopes and expectations which had made Judas at the first a disciple of Jesus?

Page 718

buy what was needed for the feast, or give something to the poor. In ministering to others, Judas might have developed an unselfish spirit. But while listening daily to the lessons of Christ and witnessing His unselfish life, Judas indulged his covetous disposition. The small sums that came into his hands were a continual temptation. Often when he did a little service for Christ, or devoted time to religious purposes, he paid himself out of this meager fund. In his own eyes these pretexts served to excuse his action; but in God's sight he was a thief.

      Christ's oft-repeated statement that His kingdom was not of this world offended Judas.11 He had marked out a line upon which he expected Christ to work. He had planned that John the Baptist should be delivered from prison.12 But lo, John was left to be beheaded.13 And Jesus, instead of asserting His royal right and avenging the death of John, retired with His disciples into a country place.14 Judas wanted more aggressive warfare. He thought that if Jesus would not prevent the disciples from carrying out their schemes, the work would be more successful.15 He marked the increasing enmity of the Jewish leaders, and saw their challenge unheeded when they demanded from Christ a sign from heaven.16 His heart was open to unbelief, and the enemy supplied thoughts of questioning and rebellion. Why did Jesus dwell so much upon that which was discouraging? Why did He predict trial and persecution for Himself and for His disciples? The prospect of having a high place in the new kingdom had led Judas to espouse the cause of Christ.17 Were his hopes to be disappointed?18 Judas had not decided that Jesus was not the Son of God; but he was questioning, and seeking to find some explanation of His mighty works.

      Notwithstanding the Saviour's own teaching, Judas was continually advancing the idea that Christ would reign as king in Jerusalem. At the feeding of the five thousand he tried to bring this about. On this occasion Judas assisted in distributing the food to the hungry multitude. He had an opportunity to see the benefit which it was in his power to impart to others. He felt the satisfaction that always comes in service to God. He helped to bring the sick and suffering from among the multitude to Christ. He saw what relief, what joy and gladness, come to human hearts through the healing power of the Restorer. He might have comprehended the methods of Christ. But he was blinded by his own selfish desires. Judas was first to take advantage of the enthusiasm excited by the miracle of the loaves. It was he who set on foot the

NOTES

      11 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      12 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      13 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      14 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      15 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      16 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      17 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      18 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

Page 719

project to take Christ by force and make Him king. His hopes were high. His disappointment was bitter.19

      Christ's discourse in the synagogue concerning the bread of life was the turning point in the history of Judas.20 He heard the words, "Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink His blood, ye have no life in you." John 6:53. He saw that Christ was offering spiritual rather than worldly good. He regarded himself as farsighted, and thought he could see that Jesus would have no honor, and that He could bestow no high position upon His followers. He determined not to unite himself so closely to Christ but that he could draw away. He would watch. And he did watch.

      From that time he expressed doubts that confused the disciples. He introduced controversies and misleading sentiments, repeating the arguments urged by the scribes and Pharisees against the claims of Christ. All the little and large troubles and crosses, the difficulties and the apparent hindrances to the advancement of the gospel, Judas interpreted as evidences against its truthfulness. He would introduce texts of Scripture that had no connection with the truths Christ was presenting. These texts, separated from their connection, perplexed the disciples, and increased the discouragement that was constantly pressing upon them. Yet all this was done by Judas in such a way as to make it appear that he was conscientious. And while the disciples were searching for evidence to confirm the words of the Great Teacher, Judas would lead them almost imperceptibly on another track. Thus in a very religious, and apparently wise, way he was presenting matters in a different light from that in which Jesus had given them, and attaching to His words a meaning that He had not conveyed. His suggestions were constantly exciting an ambitious desire for temporal preferment, and thus turning the disciples from the important things they should have considered. The dissension as to which of them should be greatest was generally excited by Judas.21

      When Jesus presented to the rich young ruler the condition of discipleship, Judas was displeased. He thought that a mistake had been made. If such men as this ruler could be connected with the believers, they would help sustain Christ's cause. If Judas were only received as a counselor, he thought, he could suggest many plans for the advantage of the little church. His principles and methods would differ somewhat from Christ's, but in these things he thought himself wiser than Christ.

NOTES

      19 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      20 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      21 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

skipping over 4 sentences in Edershiem, page 474

As if we were pressed to name a definite moment when the process of disintegration, at least sensibly, began, we would point to that Sabbath-morning at Capernaum, when Christ had preached about His Flesh as the Food of the World, and so many of His adherents ceased to follow after Him; nay, when the leaven so worked even in His disciples, that He turned to them with the searching question--intended to show them the full import of the crisis--whether they also would leave Him?

skipping over 5 sentences in Edershiem

In the disputes by the way, in the quarrels who was greatest among them, in all the pettiness of misunderstandings and realistic folly of their questions or answers, we seem to hear the echo of his voice, to see the result of his influence, the leaven of his presence. [89]And in it all we mark the downward hastening of his course, even to the moment when, in contrast to the deep love of a Mary, he first stands before us unmasked, as heartless, hypocritical, full of hatred--disappointed ambition having broken down into selfishness, and selfishness slid into covetousness, even to the crime of stealing that which was destined for the poor.

skipping over 9 sentences in Edershiem

[99] Christ would be crucified; this was quite certain.
skipping over 3 more sentences in Edershiem

[103] It vexed him still more to hear his Master rebuke the irratation he had displayed, and speak now once again, as he had been doing so often lately, of his death and burial, as if the splendid vision of his kingdom were never to be realized.

Page 720

      In all that Christ said to His disciples, there was something with which, in heart, Judas disagreed. Under his influence the leaven of disaffection was fast doing its work.22 The disciples did not see the real agency in all this; but Jesus saw that Satan was communicating his attributes to Judas, and thus opening up a channel through which to influence the other disciples. This, a year before the betrayal, Christ declared. "Have not I chosen you twelve," He said, "and one of you is a devil?" John 6:70.

      Yet Judas made no open opposition, nor seemed to question the Saviour's lessons. He made no outward murmur until the time of the feast in Simon's house. When Mary anointed the Saviour's feet, Judas manifested his covetous disposition.23 At the reproof from Jesus his very spirit seemed turned to gall.24 Wounded pride and desire for revenge broke down the barriers, and the greed so long indulged held him in control. This will be the experience of everyone who persists in tampering with sin. The elements of depravity that are not resisted and overcome, respond to Satan's temptation, and the soul is led captive at his will.

      But Judas was not yet wholly hardened. Even after he had twice pledged himself to betray the Saviour, there was opportunity for repentance. At the Passover supper Jesus proved His divinity by revealing the traitor's purpose. He tenderly included Judas in the ministry to the disciples. But the last appeal of love was unheeded. Then the case of Judas was decided, and the feet that Jesus had washed went forth to the betrayer's work.

      Judas reasoned that if Jesus was to be crucified, the event must come to pass.25 His own act in betraying the Saviour would not change the result.26 If Jesus was not to die, it would only force Him to deliver Himself.27 At all events, Judas would gain something by his treachery.28 He counted that he had made a sharp bargain in betraying his Lord.

      Judas did not, however, believe that Christ would permit Himself to be arrested. In betraying Him, it was his purpose to teach Him a lesson. He intended to play a part that would make the Saviour careful thenceforth to treat him with due respect. But Judas knew not that he was giving Christ up to death. How often, as the Saviour taught in parables, the scribes and Pharisees had been carried away with His striking illustrations! How often they had pronounced judgment against themselves! Often when the truth was brought home to their hearts, they had been filled with rage, and had taken up stones to cast at Him;

NOTES

      22 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      23 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      24 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      25 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      26 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      27 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      28 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

Hanna, page 649

But this scheme of his would bring His master to the test.

jumping back 5 pages to Hanna, page 645

Judas knew how in such a manner he had previously escaped. He must have had a strong impression that it would not be so easy thing to accomplish the arrest, when he told the men, "Whomsoever I shall kiss, that same is he; take him, and hold him fast." Take him; and hold him! it will only be if he please to be taken and to be held that they will have power to do it.

jumping forward 5 pages to Hanna, page 650

If not, then how are we to explain his surprise when he saw his Master, though still possessing all his wonderful power, as he showed by the healing of the servant's ear, allow himself to be bound and led away like a felon? Then it was, when all turned out so differently from what he had anticipated, that the idea of his having been the instrument of his Master's death entered like iron into the soul of Judas. {check on sentence 124}

Page 721

but again and again He had made His escape. Since He had escaped so many snares, thought Judas, He certainly would not now allow Himself to be taken.29

      Judas decided to put the matter to the test.30 If Jesus really was the Messiah, the people, for whom He had done so much, would rally about Him, and would proclaim Him king. This would forever settle many minds that were now in uncertainty. Judas would have the credit of having placed the king on David's throne.31 And this act would secure to him the first position, next to Christ, in the new kingdom.32

      The false disciple acted his part in betraying Jesus. In the garden, when he said to the leaders of the mob, "Whomsoever I shall kiss, that same is He: hold Him fast" (Matt. 26:48), he fully believed that Christ would escape out of their hands.33 Then if they should blame him, he could say, Did I not tell you to hold Him fast?

      Judas beheld the captors of Christ, acting upon his words, bind Him firmly. In amazement he saw that the Saviour suffered Himself to be led away.34 Anxiously he followed Him from the garden to the trial before the Jewish rulers. At every movement he looked for Him to surprise His enemies, by appearing before them as the Son of God, and setting at nought all their plots and power. But as hour after hour went by, and Jesus submitted to all the abuse heaped upon Him, a terrible fear came to the traitor that he had sold his Master to His death.35

      As the trial drew to a close, Judas could endure the torture of his guilty conscience no longer. Suddenly a hoarse voice rang through the hall, sending a thrill of terror to all hearts: He is innocent; spare Him, O Caiaphas!

      The tall form of Judas was now seen pressing through the startled throng. His face was pale and haggard, and great drops of sweat stood on his forehead. Rushing to the throne of judgment, he threw down

NOTES

      29 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      30 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      31 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      32 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      33 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      34 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      35 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

Hanna, page 650

Then it was, that, overwhelmed with nameless, countless disappointments, vexations, self-reproaches, his very living to see his Master die became intolerable to him, and in his despair he flung his ill-used life away.

skipping over to Ingraham, page 402

Here Rabbi Amos could speak no more to Him, for the crowd dragged Him off the court of Gabbatha, and so down the steep street, in the direction of the gate of the kings, that leads out to Cavalry, the public place of execution, where the Romans, since they have been masters of Jerusalem, have executed criminals by their cruel mode of crucifying.

skipping over 10 sentences in Ingraham, page 402

On the way, as they crossed the open space where once stood the palace and the statue of Antiochus Seleucus, the eyes of the Rabbi were attracted by the cries and pointed fingers of many of the people, to the body of a man lying dead at the foot of a withered fig-tree. Upon drawing nearer, he

Page 403

recognized the features of the man Judas, who had so basely betrayed his Master!

The spectacle which he exhibited was revolting, and horrid to look upon! About his neck was wound a fragment of his girdle, the other half being still secured to a limb of the tree, showing how he had met his fate. The cord had broken by his weight, and being a fleshy man, he had, most dreadful to relate, in the fall burst asunder, and the hungry dogs that infest the suburbs, were feeding upon his bowels. With cries of horror, several of the mob drove them away; but the Roman Centurion, whom Pilate had ordered to crucify Jesus for the Jews, directed four of his soldiers to convey the hideous corpse from sight, and see that it was either burned or buried.

skipping over two sentences in Ingraham, page 403

This looks like Divine retribution, and, as if Jesus were, in truth, the favored Prophet of the Highest.

Page 722

before the high priest the pieces of silver that had been the price of his Lord's betrayal. Eagerly grasping the robe of Caiaphas, he implored him to release Jesus, declaring that He had done nothing worthy of death. Caiaphas angrily shook him off, but was confused, and knew not what to say. The perfidy of the priests was revealed. It was evident that they had bribed the disciple to betray his Master.

      "I have sinned," again cried Judas, "in that I have betrayed the innocent blood." But the high priest, regaining his self-possession, answered with scorn, "What is that to us? see thou to that." Matt. 27:4. The priests had been willing to make Judas their tool; but they despised his baseness. When he turned to them with confession, they spurned him.

      Judas now cast himself at the feet of Jesus, acknowledging Him to be the Son of God, and entreating Him to deliver Himself. The Saviour did not reproach His betrayer. He knew that Judas did not repent; his confession was forced from his guilty soul by an awful sense of condemnation and a looking for of judgment, but he felt no deep, heartbreaking grief that he had betrayed the spotless Son of God, and denied the Holy One of Israel. Yet Jesus spoke no word of condemnation. He looked pityingly upon Judas, and said, For this hour came I into the world.

      A murmur of surprise ran through the assembly. With amazement they beheld the forbearance of Christ toward His betrayer. Again there swept over them the conviction that this Man was more than mortal. But if He was the Son of God, they questioned, why did He not free Himself from His bonds and triumph over His accusers?

      Judas saw that his entreaties were in vain, and he rushed from the hall exclaiming, It is too late! It is too late! He felt that he could not live to see Jesus crucified, and in despair went out and hanged himself.36

      Later that same day, on the road from Pilate's hall to Calvary, there came an interruption to the shouts and jeers of the wicked throng who were leading Jesus to the place of crucifixion.37 As they passed a retired spot, they saw at the foot of a lifeless tree, the body of Judas.38 It was a most revolting sight.39 His weight had broken the cord by which he had hanged himself to the tree.40 In falling, his body had been horribly mangled, and dogs were now devouring it.41 His remains were immediately buried out of sight; but there was less mockery among the throng, and many a pale face revealed the thoughts within. Retribution seemed already visiting those who were guilty of the blood of Jesus.42

NOTES

      36 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      37 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      38 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      39 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      40 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      41 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      42 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

Longest Phrases Index

      thirty pieces of silver, page 716
      of a slave, page 716
      they hung entranced, page 716
      in the Synagogue, page 716
      the little company, page 717
      a sign from heaven, page 718
      the leaven of, page 720
      to the test, page 721
      Himself to be, page 721
      at the foot of a, page 722
      the body of, page 722

Analysis

      Of the 173 sentences in this chapter there are none that are counted as verbatim; 46 are paraphrases of one sort or another; 3 are Bible quotes, one has the Bible has its source and 123 are independent (this amounts to 71.0983%).

Conclusions

      1) Dr. Veltman notes (on page 695) that "[t]he broad scope of this chapter's content made it difficult to locate possible source parallels." I wonder how he was able to tell which of the manuscripts that Ellen G. White wrote were used as the source(s) for any of the chapters. It's not like we have an index somewhere that says which mss was used for which chapter.

      2) On page 705, Dr. Veltman points out that we do not have any handwritten copies of the two manuscripts on which they think this chapter was based. This speaks volumes against the idea that Ellen G.White was verbally inspired. If either she believed she was verbally inspired or her assistants believed it then they would have saved those copies.

      3) On page 725, Dr. Veltman points out that Ellen G. White's "independent comments total more than double the number of sentence exhibiting literary parallels". This fact undercuts the claim that Ellen G. White copied 80-90% of her work.

David J. Conklin (June 17 - December 5, 2005)

Index