We analyze. You decide!
"No lie can live forever." Thomas Carlyle

An Analysis of the Literary Dependency
of The Desire of Ages, Chapter 39

      Some critics have accused Ellen White of plagiarizing the contents of The Desire of Ages from the writings of various authors. But, did she really? Below is an analysis of the alleged comparisons.

      It has been noted by students of plagiarism that one can make a work look plagiarized when it is not by carefully using ellipses and discarding all the material that is different. What we want to do is determine whether the critics did a fair analysis, or whether their comparisons actually distorted reality. Accordingly, we have coded the text so that you, the reader, can easily come to your own conclusion.  Material that is not coded means that neither the critics, nor Dr. Veltman and his team of researchers, could not, or did not, find anything worthy of note, or that it is Biblical material.

Color Key

Material in Ellen G. White that is an exact, word-for-word match to her alleged source.

Material in Ellen G. White that is similar to her alleged source.

Words that are either an exact, or similar, match of the source, but are also an exact, or similar, match to Biblical material.

Material that is represented in either Rea's book or Dr. Veltman's study by an ellipsis.

Material dropped from the beginning or end of the paragraph of the alleged source in Rea's book.

Material clipped from the beginning or end of a sentence in Rea's book, without giving the reader any indication of such. (Either a capital letter or a period appears where it should not, hiding the fact that material is missing.)

Material that was mis-capitalized or mis-abbreviated in Rea or Dr. Veltman's study.

      Typical author's caveat: all errors are, of course, mine. If you find any errors please let me know and I'll fix them.

Alleged Source(s) Desire of Ages. (1898)











March, Walks and Homes of Jesus. (Thomas Mitchell, 1899?): page 62

      But he was moved with compassion for the multitudes, as they continued to gather, on foot and in boats from all the neighboring towns, and they seemed to Him "as sheep having no shepherd,"--

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the crowd of people being greatly increased by additions from the annual caravan of pilgrims on their way to Jerusalem, to attend the great national feast of the passover.

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"Give Ye Them to Eat"


[This chapter is based on Matt. 14:13-21; Mark 6:32-44; Luke 9:10-17; John 6:1-13.]

      Christ had retired to a secluded place with His disciples, but this rare season of peaceful quietude was soon broken. The disciples thought they had retired where they would not be disturbed; but as soon as the multitude missed the divine Teacher, they inquired, "Where is He?" Some among them had noticed the direction in which Christ and His disciples had gone. Many went by land to meet them, while others followed in their boats across the water. The Passover was at hand, and, from far and near, bands of pilgrims on their way to Jerusalem gathered to see Jesus.1 Additions were made to their number, until there were assembled five thousand men besides women and children. Before Christ reached the shore, a multitude were waiting for Him. But He landed unobserved by them, and spent a little time apart with the disciples.

      From the hillside He looked upon the moving multitude, and His heart was stirred with sympathy. Interrupted as He was, and robbed of His rest, He was not impatient. He saw a greater necessity demanding His attention as He watched the people coming and still coming.2 He "was moved with compassion toward them, because they were as sheep not having a shepherd." Leaving His retreat, He found a convenient place where He could minister to them. They received no help from

NOTES

      1 In Dr. Veltman's study both this sentence and the previous are rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      2 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as I2 (partial independence) comparing it with March's sentence.    Return to text

Pentecost, page 3; as per Dr. Veltman's study

The rulers and religious people of the day were selfish and proud, and habitually neglected the poor and common people, much as the rich and well-to-do people do to-day.

Farrar, The Life of Christ. page 303; as per Dr. Veltman's study

The day wore on; already the sun was sinking towards the western hills, yet still the multitude lingered, charmed by that healing voice and by those holy words.

Wayland, page 245; as per Dr. Veltman's study

To purchase food in the surrounding towns and villages would be difficult.

Hanna, page 278

      But now another kind of solicitude seizes on the disciples. They may not have been as patient of the defeat of their Master's purpose as he was himself. They may have grudged to see the hours that he had destined to repose broken in upon and so fully occupied. True, they had little to do themselves but listen, and wait, and watch. The crowd grew, however; stream followed stream, and poured itself out upon the mountain side. The day declined; the evening shadows lengthened; yet, as if never satisfied, that vast company still clung to Jesus, and made no movement to depart. The disciples grew anxious. They came at last to Jesus, and said, "This is a desert place, and the time is now past: send the multitude away, that they may go into the country round about, and into the villages, and lodge, and buy bread for themselves, for they have nothing to eat." "They need not depart," said Jesus; "give you to them to eat." Turning to Philip, a native of Bethsaida, one well acquainted with the adjoining district, Jesus saith in an inquiring tone, "Whence shall we buy bread, that these may eat?" Philip runs his eye over the great assemblage, and making a rough estimate of what would be required, he answered, "Two hundred pennyworth of bread would not be sufficient for them, that every one might 'get a little;' shall we go and buy as much?" Jesus asked how much food they had among themselves, without needing to go to make any further purchase. Andrew, another native of Bethsaida, who had been scrutinizing the

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crowd, discovering some old acquaintances, said, "There is a lad here, who has five barley loaves and two small fishes; but what are they among so many?" "Bring them to me," said Jesus. They brought them. "Make the men," he said, "sit down by fifties in a company"--an order indicative of our Lord's design that there might be no confusion and that the attention of all might be directed to what he was about to do. The season was favorable--it was the full spring-tide of the year; the place was convenient--much green grass covering the broad and gentle slope that stretched away from the base of the mountain. The marshalling of five thousand men, besides women and children, into such an orderly array, must have taken some time. The people, however, quietly consented to be so arranged, and company after company sat down, till the whole were seated in the presence of the Lord, who all the while has stood in silence watching the operation, with that scanty stock of provisions in his hand. All eyes are now upon him. He begins to speak; he prays; he blesses the five loaves and the two fishes, breaks them, divides them among the twelve, and directs them to go and distribute them among the others.

Pentecost, Bible Studies, page 9

Having healed their bodies, and doubtless taught them spiritual things, he will not withhold the lesser gift of temporary refreshment.

Page 365

the priests and rulers; but the healing waters of life flowed from Christ as He taught the multitude the way of salvation.3

      The people listened to the words of mercy flowing so freely from the lips of the Son of God. They heard the gracious words, so simple and so plain that they were as the balm of Gilead to their souls. The healing of His divine hand brought gladness and life to the dying, and ease and health to those suffering with disease. The day seemed to them like heaven upon earth, and they were utterly unconscious of how long it had been since they had eaten anything.

      At length the day was far spent. The sun was sinking in the west, and yet the people lingered.4 Jesus had labored all day without food or rest. He was pale from weariness and hunger, and the disciples besought Him to cease from His toil. But He could not withdraw Himself from the multitude that pressed upon Him. The disciples finally came to Him, urging that for their own sake the people should be sent away. Many had come from far, and had eaten nothing since morning. In the surrounding towns and villages they might be able to buy food.5 But Jesus said, "Give ye them to eat," and then, turning to Philip, questioned, "Whence shall we buy bread, that these may eat?" This He said to test the faith of the disciple. Philip looked over the sea of heads, and thought how impossible it would be to provide food to satisfy the wants of such a crowd.6 He answered that two hundred pennyworth of bread would not be nearly enough to divide among them, so that each might have a little. Jesus inquired how much food could be found among the company.7 "There is a lad here," said Andrew, "which hath five barley loaves, and two small fishes; but what are they among so many?" Jesus directed that these be brought to Him. Then He bade the disciples seat the people on the grass in parties of fifty or a hundred, to preserve order, and that all might witness what He was about to do.8 When this was accomplished, Jesus took the food, "and looking up to heaven, He blessed, and brake, and gave the loaves to His disciples, and the disciples to the multitude." "And they did all eat, and were filled. And they took up twelve baskets full of the fragments, and of the fishes."

      He who taught the people the way to secure peace and happiness was just as thoughtful of their temporal necessities as of their spiritual need.9 The people were weary and faint. There were mothers with babes in their arms, and little children clinging to their skirts. Many had been standing for hours. They had been so intensely interested

NOTES

      3 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as I2 (partial independence) comparing it with Pentecost.    Return to text

      4 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      5 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      6 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase).    Return to text

      7 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      8 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      9 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

Cumming, page 89; as per Dr. Veltman's study

Jesus never wrought a miracle unless at the bidding of a providential necessity. . . . And every miracle of Christ, too, was essentially redemptive.

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in Christ's words that they had not once thought of sitting down, and the crowd was so great that there was danger of their trampling on one another. Jesus would give them a chance to rest, and He bade them sit down. There was much grass in the place, and all could rest in comfort.

      Christ never worked a miracle except to supply a genuine necessity, and every miracle was of a character to lead the people to the tree of life, whose leaves are for the healing of the nations.10 The simple food

NOTES

      10 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

Farrar, page 303; as per Dr. Veltman's study

. . . would find themselves in the darkness, hungry and afar from every human habitation.

Cumming, page 89; as per Dr. Veltman's study

[5] But we say such only are miracles; but the truth is, there is as great a miracle going on every day. [6] The fact that you place a little seed into the soil, and that seed by the influence of the air, the rain, the sunshine, the ammonia and carbon in the soil, should grow up into a stalk, and produce golden fruits in autumn, and contribute to the feeding of ten times ten thousand, this is as great a miracle every bit. [7] The contrast between the seed in the soil, and a loaf upon your table is as complete as between five loaves here and the feeding of as many thousand; but we are accustomed to the one, and we call it nature; we are not accustomed to the other, and we are constrained to admit that it is the Lord of nature. [8] But the fact is, the former is just as miraculous as the latter; and it needs as much of Deity to translate spring into harvest,as it needed of Deity to transform a few barley loaves into food for so many thousands.

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passed round by the hands of the disciples contained a whole treasure of lessons. It was humble fare that had been provided; the fishes and barley loaves were the daily food of the fisher folk about the Sea of Galilee. Christ could have spread before the people a rich repast, but food prepared merely for the gratification of appetite would have conveyed no lesson for their good. Christ taught them in this lesson that the natural provisions of God for man had been perverted. And never did people enjoy the luxurious feasts prepared for the gratification of perverted taste as this people enjoyed the rest and the simple food which Christ provided so far from human habitations.11

      If men today were simple in their habits, living in harmony with nature's laws, as did Adam and Eve in the beginning, there would be an abundant supply for the needs of the human family. There would be fewer imaginary wants, and more opportunities to work in God's ways. But selfishness and the indulgence of unnatural taste have brought sin and misery into the world, from excess on the one hand, and from want on the other.

      Jesus did not seek to attract the people to Him by gratifying the desire for luxury. To that great throng, weary and hungry after the long, exciting day, the simple fare was an assurance not only of His power, but of His tender care for them in the common needs of life. The Saviour has not promised His followers the luxuries of the world; their fare may be plain, and even scanty; their lot may be shut in by poverty; but His word is pledged that their need shall be supplied, and He has promised that which is far better than worldly good,--the abiding comfort of His own presence.

      In feeding the five thousand, Jesus lifts the veil from the world of nature, and reveals the power that is constantly exercised for our good. In the production of earth's harvests God is working a miracle every day.12 Through natural agencies the same work is accomplished that was wrought in the feeding of the multitude.13 Men prepare the soil and sow the seed, but it is the life from God that causes the seed to germinate.14 It is God's rain and air and sunshine that cause it to put forth, "first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear." Mark 4:28.15 It is God who is every day feeding millions from earth's harvest fields.16 Men are called upon to co-operate with God in the care of the grain and the preparation of the loaf, and because of this they lose sight of the divine agency. They do not give God the glory due unto

NOTES

      11 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as I2 (partial independence).    Return to text

      12 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase--see sentences 5-6).    Return to text

      13 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P3 (loose paraphrase--see sentence 8).    Return to text

      14 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase--see sentence 6).    Return to text

      15 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as I2 (partial independence--see sentences 6 & 7).    Return to text

      16 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase--see sentences 7 & 8).    Return to text

Cumming, page 90; as per Dr. Veltman's study

For our mercies we give thanks to the instrument; the miracles of God we attribute to the laws of nature; and in both we try, designedly or undesignedly, to banish God from the world, and work creation without him.

Cumming, page 88; as per Dr. Veltman's study

He who had all the resources of infinitude at his command, would not waste a fragment! . . . The Lord of all plenty, the Maker, Creator, and Proprietor of all, would not allow one fragment to fall that would be useful to a single human being, or that could be gathered up and collected for the benefit of others that were not there.

Wayland, page 246; as per Dr.Veltman's study

The providence of God had, however, placed him in his present circumstances, and he might therefore properly look to PROVIDENCE for deliverance. This event, then, furnishes the rule by which we are to be governed.

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His holy name. The working of His power is ascribed to natural causes or to human instrumentality.17 Man is glorified in place of God, and His gracious gifts are perverted to selfish uses, and made a curse instead of a blessing. God is seeking to change all this. He desires that our dull senses shall be quickened to discern His merciful kindness and to glorify Him for the working of His power. He desires us to recognize Him in His gifts, that they may be, as He intended, a blessing to us. It was to accomplish this purpose that the miracles of Christ were performed.

      After the multitude had been fed, there was an abundance of food left. But He who had all the resources of infinite power at His command said, "Gather up the fragments that remain, that nothing be lost." These words meant more than putting the bread into the baskets. The lesson was twofold. Nothing is to be wasted.18 We are to let slip no temporal advantage. We should neglect nothing that will tend to benefit a human being.19 Let everything be gathered up that will relieve the necessity of earth's hungry ones.20 And there should be the same carefulness in spiritual things. When the baskets of fragments were collected, the people thought of their friends at home. They wanted them to share in the bread that Christ had blessed. The contents of the baskets were distributed among the eager throng, and were carried away into all the region round about. So those who were at the feast were to give to others the bread that comes down from heaven, to satisfy the hunger of the soul. They were to repeat what they had learned of the wonderful things of God. Nothing was to be lost. Not one word that concerned their eternal salvation was to fall useless to the ground.

      The miracle of the loaves teaches a lesson of dependence upon God. When Christ fed the five thousand, the food was not nigh at hand. Apparently He had no means at His command. Here He was, with five thousand men, besides women and children, in the wilderness. He had not invited the large multitude to follow Him; they came without invitation or command; but He knew that after they had listened so long to His instruction, they would feel hungry and faint; for He was one with them in their need of food. They were far from home, and the night was close at hand. Many of them were without means to purchase food. He who for their sake had fasted forty days in the wilderness would not suffer them to return fasting to their homes. The providence of God had placed Jesus where He was; and He depended on His heavenly Father for the means to relieve the necessity.21

NOTES

      17 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      18 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      19 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      20 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      21 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase--see sentences 5-6).    Return to text

Wayland, page 246, continuing from above; as per Dr.Veltman's study

When we plunge ourselves into difficulty, by a neglect of the means or by a misuse of the faculties which God has bestowed on us, it is to be expected that he will leave us to our own devices. But when, in the honest discharge of our duties, we find ourselves in circumstances beyond the reach of human aid, we then may confidently look up to God for deliverance. He will always take care of us while we are in the spot where he has placed us. When he appoints for us trials, he also appoints for us the means of escape. The path of duty, though it may seem arduous, is ever the path of safety. [skipping over two sentences] Though his whole store was barely sufficient to supply the needs of his immediate family, he began to share it with the thousands who surrounded him.

Page 369

      And when we are brought into strait places, we are to depend on God. We are to exercise wisdom and judgment in every action of life, that we may not, by reckless movements, place ourselves in trial. We are not to plunge into difficulties, neglecting the means God has provided, and misusing the faculties He has given us.22 Christ's workers are to obey His instructions implicitly. The work is God's, and if we would bless others His plans must be followed. Self cannot be made a center; self can receive no honor. If we plan according to our own ideas, the Lord will leave us to our own mistakes.23 But when, after following His directions, we are brought into strait places, He will deliver us.24 We are not to give up in discouragement, but in every emergency we are to seek help from Him who has infinite resources at His command. Often we shall be surrounded with trying circumstances, and then, in the fullest confidence, we must depend upon God.25 He will keep every soul that is brought into perplexity through trying to keep the way of the Lord.26

      Christ has bidden us, through the prophet, "Deal thy bread to the hungry," and "satisfy the afflicted soul;" "when thou seest the naked, that thou cover him," and "bring the poor that are cast out to thy house." Isa. 58:7-10. He has bidden us, "Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature." Mark 16:15. But how often our hearts sink, and faith fails us, as we see how great is the need, and how small the means in our hands. Like Andrew looking upon the five barley loaves and the two little fishes, we exclaim, "What are they among so many?" Often we hesitate, unwilling to give all that we have, fearing to spend and to be spent for others. But Jesus has bidden us, "Give ye them to eat." His command is a promise; and behind it is the same power that fed the multitude beside the sea.

      In Christ's act of supplying the temporal necessities of a hungry multitude is wrapped up a deep spiritual lesson for all His workers. Christ received from the Father; He imparted to the disciples; they imparted to the multitude; and the people to one another. So all who are united to Christ will receive from Him the bread of life, the heavenly food, and impart it to others.

      In full reliance upon God, Jesus took the small store of loaves; and although there was but a small portion for His own family of disciples, He did not invite them to eat, but began to distribute to them, bidding them serve the people.27 The food multiplied in His hands; and the hands of the disciples, reaching out to Christ Himself the Bread of

NOTES

      22 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as V2 (verbatim).    Return to text

      23 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase--referring to the same sentence as above).    Return to text

      24 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      25 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      26 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      27 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as I2 (partial independence).    Return to text

Wayland, 247 (skipping over 4 sentences from the above); as per Dr. Veltman's study

If the work be of God, he will furnish us with helpers as fast as they are needed. [skipping over 10 sentences] If I mistake not, it suggests to us that in works of benevolence we are accustomed to rely too much on human and too little on divine aid. . . .? Every one is apt thus to forget his own personal duty, and rely upon the labor of others, and it is well if he does not put his organization in the place of God himself.

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Life, were never empty. The little store was sufficient for all. After the wants of the people had been supplied, the fragments were gathered up, and Christ and His disciples ate together of the precious, Heaven-supplied food.

      The disciples were the channel of communication between Christ and the people. This should be a great encouragement to His disciples today. Christ is the great center, the source of all strength. His disciples are to receive their supplies from Him. The most intelligent, the most spiritually minded, can bestow only as they receive. Of themselves they can supply nothing for the needs of the soul. We can impart only that which we receive from Christ; and we can receive only as we impart to others. As we continue imparting, we continue to receive; and the more we impart, the more we shall receive. Thus we may be constantly believing, trusting, receiving, and imparting.

      The work of building up the kingdom of Christ will go forward, though to all appearance it moves slowly and impossibilities seem to testify against advance. The work is of God, and He will furnish means, and will send helpers, true, earnest disciples, whose hands also will be filled with food for the starving multitude.28 God is not unmindful of those who labor in love to give the word of life to perishing souls, who in their turn reach forth their hands for food for other hungry souls.

      In our work for God there is danger of relying too largely upon what man with his talents and ability can do.29 Thus we lose sight of the one Master Worker. Too often the worker for Christ fails to realize his personal responsibility. He is in danger of shifting his burden upon organizations, instead of relying upon Him who is the source of all strength.30 It is a great mistake to trust in human wisdom or numbers in the work of God. Successful work for Christ depends not so much on numbers or talent as upon pureness of purpose, the true simplicity of earnest, dependent faith. Personal responsibilities must be borne, personal duties must be taken up, personal efforts must be made for those who do not know Christ. In the place of shifting your responsibility upon someone whom you think more richly endowed than you are, work according to your ability.

      When the question comes home to your heart, "Whence shall we buy bread, that these may eat?" let not your answer be the response of unbelief. When the disciples heard the Saviour's direction, "Give ye them to eat," all the difficulties arose in their minds. They questioned,

NOTES

      28 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as I2 (partial independence).    Return to text

      29 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

      30 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

Wayland, 247 (picking up some of the sentences from above); as per Dr. Veltman

Small as was his provision at the commencement, it remained unconsumed until the deed of mercy was done, and the wants of the famishing host were supplied. (skipping over 3 sentences) If the work be of God, he will furnish us with helpers as fast as they are needed. In all ages, God has rewarded abundantly simple trust in him, and has bestowed upon it the highest honor.

Hanna, page 279

      And now, among those thousands--sitting there and ranged so that all can see what is going on--the mystery of their feeding begins to show itself. There were one hundred companies of fifty, besides the women and children. In each apostle's hand, as he takes his portion from the hand of Jesus, there is not more than would meet one man's need. Yet, as the distribution by the twelve begins, there is enough to give what looks like a sufficient portion to each of the hundred men who sits at the head of his company. He gets it, and little enough as it seems for himself; he is told to divide it, and give the half of it to his neighbor, to be dealt with in like fashion. Each man in the ranks, as he begins to break, finds that the half that he got at first grows into a whole in the very act of dividing and bestowing; the small initial supply grows and multiplies in the transmission from hand to hand, All eat--all are satisfied. "Gather up," said Jesus, as he saw some unused food lying scattered upon the ground, "the fragments that remain, that nothing be lost." They do; and while one basket could hold the five loaves and the two fishes, it now takes twelve to hold these fragments.

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Shall we go away into the villages to buy food? So now, when the people are destitute of the bread of life, the Lord's children question, Shall we send for someone from afar, to come and feed them? But what said Christ? "Make the men sit down," and He fed them there. So when you are surrounded by souls in need, know that Christ is there. Commune with Him. Bring your barley loaves to Jesus.

      The means in our possession may not seem to be sufficient for the work; but if we will move forward in faith, believing in the all-sufficient power of God, abundant resources will open before us. If the work be of God, He Himself will provide the means for its accomplishment.31 He will reward honest, simple reliance upon Him.32 The little that is wisely and economically used in the service of the Lord of heaven will increase in the very act of imparting. In the hand of Christ the small supply of food remained undiminished until the famished multitude were satisfied.33 If we go to the Source of all strength, with our hands of faith outstretched to receive, we shall be sustained in our work, even under the most forbidding circumstances, and shall be enabled to give to others the bread of life.

      The Lord says, "Give, and it shall be given unto you." "He that soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly; and he that soweth with blessings shall reap also with blessings. . . . And God is able to make all grace abound unto you; that ye, having always all sufficiency in everything, may abound unto every good work; as it is written,--

"He hath scattered abroad, he hath given to the poor:
His righteousness abideth forever.                           

"And He that supplieth seed to the sower and bread for food, shall supply and multiply your seed for sowing, and increase the fruits of your righteousness: ye being enriched in everything unto all liberality, which worketh through us thanksgiving to God." Luke 6:38; 2 Cor. 9:6-11, R. V., margin.

NOTES

      31 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase--note that in Wayland God provides "helpers," while in EGW He provides "the means").    Return to text

      32 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P1 (strict paraphrase).    Return to text

      33 In Dr. Veltman's study this sentence is rated as P2 (simple paraphrase).    Return to text

Longest Phrases
(only three words or longer are included here)

      five thousand men, page 364; I found this phrase
      besides women and children, page 364; I found this phrase
      of pilgrims on their way to Jerusalem, page 364
      The sun was sinking, page 365
      In the surrounding towns and villages, page 365
      how much food, page 365
      what He was about to do., page 365
      a miracle every, page 367
      be gathered up, page 368
      The providence of God had, page 368
      will leave us to our own, page 369
      He will furnish, page 370
      If the work be of God, He, page 371
      in the very act of, page 371; I found this phrase

Analysis

      Of the 158 sentences in this chapter Dr. Veltman and his team of researchers considered one to be verbatim ("We are not to plunge into difficulties, neglecting the means God has provided, and misusing the faculties He has given us."), 28 are rated as paraphrases of one sort or another, 16 come from the Bible, and 113 are rated as independent of one type or another (almost 71.52%). Combining the independent with the Bible we arrive at 79.1139% which is very close to the amount that is alleged Ellen G. White copied. Again, this leads us to believe that the critics simply misunderstood their own math (if indeed they did do any math on this subject).

CONCLUSIONS

      1) On page 400 of his study Dr. Veltman notes that there "is the need for a careful and thorough comparison of [Ellen G. White's] content with that of her sources. This is not the only chapter to have triggered the desire for content analysis." To date no such work has been done. Obviously showing full paragraphs (where possible and when they are available) helps us to understand the context of the material from her alleged source(s).

      2) On page 404, Dr. Veltman notes that "the modifications and additions of Ellen White, particularly in the post-narrative comment, mark the work as her own." Of course, the critics never pass along this comment on their web sites.

David J. Conklin (January 18, 2005 - February 3, 2006)

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